Unravelling the mystery of Qi

get into the flow of the wu-wei, the space where attainment is easy, achievement without effort.

Qi (pronounced chee) is the universal force of life, responsible for movement, motivation, reproduction and growth.  Contained in all living organisms, in many ancient philosophies it is disturbances in the manifestation, movement, retention and dispersal of Qi that lead to dysfunctions in the person, creating dis-ease and discomfort. 

Qi combines with Jing (the substance of transformation) to create our individual constitutional make up, it is both supporting and nourishing, , helping every cell in our body to reproduce and perpetuate the 7 year cycle of transformation in women (8 years in men), imbuing organisms with potential, the possibility of development.

Nothing rests, everything moves and vibrates, pure energy vibrates at different frequencies, as can most easily be seen in the light spectrum, with different frequencies creating different colours.

Qi blog pic 1 (1)  

Even at rest your body is transforming, taking in air, expelling carbon dioxide, cleansing blood, releasing hormones, generating T-cells, extracting nutrition from food, sorting thought the issues of the day.  That these processes happen effortless in  our sleep reminds us that life is a space of constant change and our ‘job’ is to find the most graceful, peaceful ways to find our own personal state of balance, to get into the flow of the wu-wei, the space where attainment is easy, achievement without effort.

Energy is no one force or thing, 32 distinct types of qi have been identified, they combine to create ‘the one Qi’ also known as prana or life force; found in all living things, it has five main functions: 

  1. Movement – including physical agility, dexterity and coordination
  2. Protection – on all levels including physical, emotional, biochemical, physiological, energetic and spiritual
  3. Harmonious transformation – the graceful and consistent  transformation from one state to another
  4. Retention of substances and organs – your body’s physical ability to contain itself and function optimally against both internal and external forces, such as gravity, inertia etc.
  5. Temperature regulation – imbalances are more at times of menopause when hot flushes are accepted as an expected symptom. 

Qi come from 3 main sources:

Qi is transferred between parents and child at the moment of conception, it is partly responsible for our inherited constitution.  Stored in the kidneys it combines with jing to determine our unique constitution, personality and make up.

Qi is derived from the digestion of the food we eat.  Consider your personal constitution when eating fast food, a plant rich diet, excessive carbohydrates.  Does your mood change?  How is your digestion when you eat on an argument? Qi is not just about the composition of our bodies it affects how we feel in our bodies.

Qi is extracted by the lungs from the air we breathe. Do you feel different in specific locations? Are you affected by a polluted city, an air conditioned building, a forest, being on or near the water.  

5 main types of Qi include:

  • Organ Qi – each organ has its own distinct qi and metaphorical associations
  • Meridian Qi – normal or upright qi as it flows through the superficial meridian system .
  • Nutritive Qi – an essential force in the nourishment of the body, this qi transforms nutrients in the blood
  • Protective Qi – described as being ‘fierce and bold’ it resists and combats ‘external pernicious influences’
  • Ancestral Qi – aids and regulates rhythmic movement of breath and heart beat.

Exploring and understanding the factors that influence your unique Qi blueprint enable you to address your own well-being and health aspirations from a completely personalised perspective.  Creating a bespoke personalised combination of techniques and simple lifestyles adjustments enables you to address your own unique situation from an informed perspective, where you can use your unique understanding of your own story to realise your full potential.

Join us as we dive deeper into the mysteries of Qi, learn how to identify your own imbalances and bring them back to harmony to help you more easily get into the flow of the wu-wei.  For full details of the next workshop, please click here

 

The true cost of impostor syndrome

Is impostor syndrome holding you back and preventing you from realising your full potential? Read on to find out how to stop feeling like a fraud and enjoy more of what you love.

 

Imposter SyndromeImpostor syndrome is often accompanied by high levels of anxiety and feelings of self-doubt, impacting the person’s sense of their own worth, impeding their progress and preventing them from easily realising their full potential.

Impostor syndrome does not discriminate by profession, gender or age.  Anyone can fall prey as it worms itself into the psyche, creating an internal narrative that questions one’s ability, experience and, eventually, one’s very existence.  Thoughts take the form of ‘who do you think you are’ and present a less than humble view of ourselves, suggesting egotistical self importance and dishonesty. 

Trying to rationalise impostor syndrome is like trying to talk down a tired toddler on a sugar rush; infuriating, exhausting and futile.

Impostor syndrome often occurs when a person embarks on a learning journey and wishes to share their knowledge and experience with others, reaching a stage where they know more than the average person in the street yet still with more to learn, to master the subject fully.  Realising the impact the learning has had for them they take the courageous step to share it with others.

As a practitioner, instructor, teacher or sharer of information/knowledge/experience, we provide a safe space where students may explore different ideas and their own relationship with them, where questions can be asked and debated.  It is no teachers job to be the font of all knowledge, but a guide imparting wisdom, stimulating the curiosity of those who wish to learn, wherever they may be on their journey.

Authenticity is the new rock ‘n roll

It is impossible for  authenticity and impostor syndrome to co-exist.  The authentic practitioner/teacher knows and works within the current limits of their own learning, seeking to continually deepen/broaden their knowledge and allowing themselves the space and time to grow.

shoulders of giants

Knowledge + Experience = wisdom

Human beings are effective recycling units, accumulating knowledge and experience and passing it on as wisdom, providing a foundation for the next generation to springboard from.  The more we go through in life, the more we learn.  Impostor syndrome makes us doubt our own wisdom and prevents us from sharing it with others. True, we may not yet know the answers but we know the combinations we have tried and can pass on the baton to give those that follow a running start.

Impostor syndrome prevents that baton from being passed on.  The richness of your knowledge and experience is lost to history and subsequent endeavours must start from zero.  Consider for a moment the impact of that on your own life. Quickly think of 10 things you know about  because someone else shared their wisdom with you. From ironing a shirt to splitting the atom, all learning builds on the input and experience of others.

Impostor syndrome perpetuates the negative internal narrative that holds us back, reinforcing our lack of self worth and impeding our progress. 

Just for today, consider what could happen if you shared your wisdom and it helped someone else have a better day.  How would that be?


Tips to combat Impostor syndrome

  • Acknowledge how far you’ve come / how much you’ve learned.

Reflect on where you were before you began studying your subject of interest.              What have you learned? How have you changed?

  • Seek feedback

Asking for feedback can feel terrifying but it serves a dual purpose.  Feedback encourages your clients/students to reflect on their experience and learning, it also provides you with regular insights into your practice, what is working for people and how you might improve/refine your practice.  Written feedback can be easier to process but, either way, ask your clients and students for feedback on 4 aspects:

  1. What did they learn
  2. What did they enjoy
  3. What didn’t they enjoy
  4. What changes could you make to improve their experience
  • Make a record of ALL your achievements

From learning to walk to passing your last exam, from getting out of bed on a challenging day to working with your first client/student.  Recording and reviewing personal achievements creates a firm foundation from which to build self confidence plus it’s a great tool to get you back on track on a difficult day.

  • Talk about it

You will be amazed how many of the people you respect and admire have experienced impostor syndrome. Allow yourself to learn from them and stand on the shoulders of giants.


Impostor syndrome is one of the unhelpful belief systems I help people to acknowledge, address and change in my 1-2-1 kinesiology clinic sessions.

When you’re ready to step into your true self and realise your full potential, please get in touch to find out how.

I look forward to working with you

Full IKC Touch for Health Syllabus

For details of the next Touch for Health training dates please contact me

Full IKC Touch for health Syllabus

Touch for Health Kinesiology Level I:
The art of muscle testing & 14-Muscle/Meridian Balancing “As-You-Go”
Introductory kinesiology workshop for lay people and health professionals
Accurate indicator muscle testing; “challenging” reflexes to find deeper levels to balance
Emotional stress release (for present distress)
14 muscle-tests as biofeedback for posture and 14 major energy meridians
5 reflex systems and nutrition for balancing muscles, posture and energy
Simple pain control techniques
Improve Sensory, auditory and visual perception and physical range of motion with auricular and visual balancing
Level 1 is open to all. It is suitable for the lay-person who has no prior knowledge of muscles/anatomy/posture or Chinese acupuncture energy theory.
Most kinesiologists learn TFH during their training.
Official IKC TFH Level 1 Syllabus

Introduction to Touch for Health
What is Touch for Health?
History, Triangle of Health, Opposing Muscle Theory
Switching On
Water
Central Meridian Check
Switching Points
Cross Crawl for Fun
Auricular Energy
Meridian Massage
Accurate Indicator Muscle Testing

Introduction to Muscle Testing
Education, Communication and Permission: the Self-Responsibility Model
Pre-checks for accurate muscle testing – Physical, Mental/Emotional, Biochemical
Accurate Indicator Muscle Testing
Challenges
Switching On
Central Meridian Energy Check
Hydration
Subjective Evaluation

Muscle/Meridian Balancing Touch Reflexes
Spinal Reflexes
Neurolymphatic Massage Points (reflexes)
Neurovascular Holding Points (reflexes)
Energy Meridians from Acupuncture
Muscle Origin-Insertion Technique
Challenging a Balancing Reflex
Muscles that Won’t “Switch-off”
Emotional Stress Release
Using Food to Balance Specific Muscles

Other Balancing Techniques
Posture Awareness
Cross Crawl for Fun
Auricular Energy
Visual Inhibition
Simple Pain Techniques
Surrogate Testing
Goal Balancing
Balancing-As-You-Go Procedure

Muscle Tests and Balancing Reflexes for 14 Muscles and Related Meridians:

Muscle Related                                Meridian
Supraspinatus                                    Central
Teres Major                                         Governing
Pectoralis Major Clavicular             Stomach
Latissimus Dorsi                                Spleen
Subscapularis                                     Heart
Quadriceps                                          Small Intestine
Peroneus                                              Bladder
Psoas                                                     Kidney
Gluteus Medius                                   Circulation/Sex
Teres Minor                                         Triple Warmer
Anterior Deltoid                                 Gall Bladder
Pectoralis Major Sternal                   Liver
Anterior Serratus                               Lung
Fascia Lata                                          Large Intestine


Touch for Health Kinesiology Level 2:
Exploring energy maps & One-Point Balancing
PRE-REQUISITE: TFH Level 1; practical and written exercises from Level 1
14 additional muscle tests
Circuit locating to find an optimal touch reflex, or alarm points to indicate excess energy
Emotional stress release (for future performance)
Assess energy patterns in the 24-hour Wheel & Five Element (seasonal) cycles and find the “One-Point” to balance all the muscles/energy meridians
Food Testing- identify foods that raise or lower energy
Acupressure Holding Points, neuromuscular reflexes including spindle cell and golgi tendon
More simple pain control including “Meridian Walking” technique for recent/localised pain

Muscle/Meridian Balancing Touch Reflexes
Circuit Locating
Precheck Evaluations with Circuit Locating
Spindle Cell Mechanism
Golgi Tendon Apparatus
Acupressure Holding Points
Cerebral Spinal Technique
Yin and Yang
Balancing Using the Meridian Wheel
Alarm Points and Over-Energy
Beaver Dam
Triangles and Squares
Midday/Midnight Relationship
The Law of Five Elements (Shen and Ko Cycles)

Other Balancing Techniques
Food Testing for Biogenic, Biostatic and Biocidic Foods
Emotional Stress Relief (ESR) for Future Performance
Simple Pain Techniques
Time of Day Balance
Meridian Massage
Meridian Walking
Cerebrospinal Technique
Cross Crawl Integration
One-Point Balancing According to the Wheel and Five Elements

Muscle Tests and Balancing Reflexes for 14 Additional Muscles:
Muscle Related                                                  Meridian
Anterior Neck Flexors   & Brachioradialis     Stomach
Lower & Middle Trapezius                                Spleen
Rectus Abdominis                                               Small Intestine
Sacrospinalis                                                        Bladder
Iliacus                                                                    Kidney
Adductors & Piriformis                                      Circulation/Sex
Sartorius                                                                Triple Warmer
Popliteus                                                               Gall Bladder
Rhomboid                                                             Liver
Middle Deltoid                                                     Lung
Quadratus Lumborum                                       Large Intestine


Touch For Health Kinesiology Level 3:
The Body Deal – Reactive Muscle Balancing
PRE-REQUISITE: TFH Level 2: practical and written exercises from Level 2
Review and practice 1-point balancing (Wheel & Five Elements)
Five Element sound balancing
14 additional muscles (this completes the TFH 42 Muscles)
Emotional stress release (for past experiences/trauma)
Balancing reactive muscles for combined muscle function and long-standing pain relief
Chinese 5-Element colour balance
Balance “gaits” function and physical co-ordination
Luo points (acupressure holding points to balance yin/yang within an element)
Pulse points for assessing/balancing excess energy
Pain tapping to reduce or eliminate long-standing pain

Balancing Techniques
Five Element Colour Balance
Five Element Emotions
Five Element Balancing with Goal and Emotion
Five Element Balancing with Food
Sedation Techniques
ESR for Past Trauma
Pulse Check
Pain Tapping for Chronic Pain
Reactive Muscles Review

Other Balancing Techniques
Facilitation and Inhibition
Circuit Retaining Mode
Resetting Reactive Muscle Relationships
Gait Checking and Balancing
 
Muscle Tests and Balancing Reflexes for 14+ Additional Muscles:

Muscle Related…                                                       Meridian
Posterior Neck Extensors & Levator Scapulae      Stomach
Opponens Pollicis Longus & Triceps                       Spleen
Transverse and Oblique Abdominals                     Small Intestine
Anterior and Posterior Tibials                                 Bladder
Upper Trapezius                                                         Kidney
Gluteus Maximus                                                       Circulation Sex
Gracilis, Soleus & Gastrocnemius                           Triple Warmer
Coracobrachialis & Diaphragm                               Lung
Hamstrings                                                                  Large Intestine


Touch For Health Kinesiology Level 4:
Going Deeper – Postural Analysis & Balancing, Review & Consolidation

PRE-REQUISITE: TFH Level 3: practical and written exercises from Level 3
Complete 42 muscle balance: standing, sitting or lying
Analyze and balance specific postural deviations
Reactive muscle review
Figure 8 energy balancing
Past balancing to holistically relieve stress from past trauma throughout mind and body
Postural stress release for stress held in “muscle memory” associated with postures/experiences

Balancing Techniques
Figure Eight Energy
Five Elements and Meridian Review
Five Element Emotions
Five Element Sound Balance
Acupressure Holding Point Theory
Luo Points
Time of Day Balance
Postural Stress Release
Neurolymphatic Release
Reactive Muscles Review
Postural Analysis
Muscle Tests and Balancing Reflexes for:
42 Muscles Head to Toe, Standing
42 Muscles Head to Toe, Prone and Supine
Outcomes and Applications of Touch for Health:
IKC Instructor Training Requirements
Aims of the International Kinesiology College
Guidelines for Practical Assessment
The TFH Synthesis “Database” Balancing Procedure